Reduces signs of old age and crow’s feet :

In this 4-week study, the following results were observed:

  • Reduced signs of aging in 90% of patients with smoother skin
  • Reduction of crow’s feet
  • Reduction of redness
  • Increased collagen levels in 100% of patients.

Weiss. RA et al. – Clinical trial of a novel non-thermal LED array for reversal of photoaging: clinical, histologic, and surface profilometric results.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15654716

 

Reduces wrinkles, rejuvenates skin and reduces pore size:

The stimulation of collagen and elastin production leads to the firming of the skin and thus a reduction of the appearance of wrinkles and the disappearance of fine lines.

Studies also confirm that a majority of people using red light see a reduction in the size of facial pores.

Pore size reduction in 90% of patients. Increased skin clarity in 90% of patients. Wrinkle reduction in 45% of patients.

Lask, G. et al. – The utilization of nonthermal blue (405-425 nm) and near infrared (850-890 nm) light in aesthetic dermatology and surgery-a multicenter study.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16414904

Russell, B.A. et al. – A study to determine the efficacy of light therapy in facial skin rejuvenation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16414908

 

Firmer and smoother skin:

The study showed that after several sessions of light therapy, an improvement in the complexion, softness, smoothness and firmness of the patients’ skin was observed.

Russell, B.A. et al. – A study to determine the efficacy of light therapy in facial skin rejuvenation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16414908

 

Stimulates the production of collagen and elastin:

Light penetrates the skin to the dermis where collagen production takes place. Light stimulates the production of collagen and elastin to revive the skin’s healing process.

Lee, S.Y. et al. – A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, and split-face clinical study on LED phototherapy for skin rejuvenation

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17566756

 

Improves skin’s ability to heal:

Red light helps reduce old age spots, sun spots and skin discolorations. By stimulating the production of collagen, the skin cells renew and the spots disappear.

At the end of the 4-week study, 74% of patients showed a visible improvement in the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

Red light has also been shown to reduce sebum secretion from the sebaceous glands, making your skin less oily.

Sadick, N.S. et al. – A study to determine the efficacy of a novel handheld light-emitting diode device in the treatment of photo-aged skin.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19146602

 

Improves moisture retention, skin suppleness and firmness:

With increased collagen and elastin, your skin becomes firmer. Your skin’s moisture retention will improve.

Wunsch, A et al. – A controlled trial to determine the efficacy of red and near-infrared light treatment in patient satisfaction, reduction of fine lines, wrinkles, skin roughness, and intradermal collagen density increase.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24286286

 

Stimulates skin healing:

Red light increases the rate of cell regeneration and thus accelerates the healing of the skin and the disappearance of scars.

Whelan, H.T. et al. – Effect of NASA light-emitting diode irradiation on wound healing.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11776448

 

Skin oxygenation and detoxification:

Red light increases the transfer of energy between skin molecules that absorb this energy. These activated molecules cause the skin to oxygenate and detoxify.

Karu, T. – Primary and secondary mechanisms of action of visible to near-infrared light on cells.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10365442

 

Makes skin less oily:

It was shown in this study that red light reduced sebum secretion from the sebaceous glands and thus made the skin less oily.

 

Sadick, N.S. et al. – A study to determine the efficacy of a novel handheld light-emitting diode device in the treatment of photo-aged skin.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19146602